Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /var/www/vhosts/lamoth.org/httpdocs/core/inc/bigtree/navigation.php on line 319

This is a collection of photo-documents and artifacts depicting the daily life in the Hungarian forced labor service, commonly known as labor battalions. This group includes such artifacts as armbands and a labor company sign, which we believed to be authentic.

RG-10.V:  FRANK VADASZ COLLECTION

The Hungarian Military Labor Service established labor companies for Jewish men. The companies, organized into battalions, and commanded by Hungarian commissioned and non-commissioned officers, later became known as Hungarian Labor Battalions. Jewish servicemen wore Hungarian military uniforms but had no right to carry any weapons, were in command of Jewish labor companies. These companies were assigned to building fortifications and to various military or civil projects and roads. Some Jewish labor companies followed the Hungarian combat units to the front lines, while others were stationed in the Hungarian or Hungarian-annexed territories. 

Frank Vadasz, a Jewish labor serviceman, was stationed with his company in Chust or Huszt (Subcarpathian Rus), Sarospatak (Northern Hungary), and Petarda (a territory annexed from Yugoslavia) in 1940.

In 1984, Frank Vadasz donated his collection of the photographs to the museum.

Frank Vadasz was conscripted into Hungarian Labor Service in 1940. The Hungarian Military Labor Service drafted Jewish men into labor companies. The latter were organized into larger military formations – battalions. These Jewish labor units became later known as Hungarian Labor Battalions. Jewish servicemen had no right to carry any weapon, although they were allowed to wear Hungarian military uniform. Hungarian commissioned on non-commissioned officers were in command of the Jewish labor companies. Jewish labor companies were assigned to build fortifications, roads, and various military or civil object  under the authority of the Hungarian Armed Forces. Some Jewish labor companies followed Hungarian combat units to the front lines, while the others were stationed in the Hungarian or Hungarian-annexed territories.

The Frank Vadasz Collection depicts one of those Jewish labor companies that was stationed in 1940-1942 in the Hungarian-annexed region of Subcarpathian Rus, the former province of Czechoslovakia.

Frank Vadasz, in 1940-1942, was one of those Jewish laborers conscripted for military service in the Labor Battalions. During 1940-1942, his company was stationed in Chust or Huszt (Subcarpathian Rus), Sarospatak (Northern Hungary), and Petarda (a territory annexed from Yugoslavia).

In 1984, Frank Vadasz donated his collection of photographs to the LAMOTH.