Sunday, November 12
3:00 pm 

 

Join us for a screening of

THE PACKAGE TOUR (Társasutazás) 

 

Followed by Q&A with Director Gyula Gazdag and SEEfest Founder Vera Mijojlic

 

In cooperation with South East European Film Festival Los Angeles (SEEfest) 

 

Gyula Gazdag’s documentary focuses on a group embarking on a tour to Auschwitz and Birkenau –- a group made up of former inmates and their sons and daughters. Gazdag also talks with one woman who was eager to take part in the trip, but was prevented by a wound she received forty years before in the camp – from a kick by a booted foot. The Package Tour asks why these people have come back –- to remember? To try to understand how it could happen? Could it possibly happen again? It is a film of wrinkled faces, furrowed foreheads and words spoken by people struggling to suppress their emotions. 

RSVP

Gyula Gazdag is a professor at UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television. He has served as the Artistic Director of the Sundance Filmmakers Lab since 1997. Gazdag has been a creative advisor at the Maurits Binger Film Institute in Amsterdam since 2002, and at the Script Station of the Berlinale Talent Campus since 2006. Daily Variety selected him as one of the ten best film teachers of 2011. His numerous feature films include A Hungarian Fairy Tale, winner of Best Feature Film of the Year of the Hungarian Film Critics and screened at Cannes Directors’ Fortnight, Stand Off, winner of a Special Jury Prize at the San Sebastian Festival, Lost Illusions, winner of Best Screenplay at the Hungarian Film Week, Swap, Singing on the Treadmill, which was banned in Hungary for 10 years, and The Whistling Cobblestone, which was banned from foreign exhibition for 12 years. His documentary work includes The Banquet, Package Tour and The Resolution, which was named one of the 100 best documentaries of all time by the International Documentary Association, and The Selection.The latter two were also banned in Communist Hungary for more than a decade.

Founded in 2002 and incorporated in 2006, the South East European Film Festival in Los Angeles (SEEfest) pioneered the concept of regional, cross-border programming with issue-driven films that tell a larger story about South East Europe, where borders of all kinds are fluid and porous just as often as poisonous. By presenting multiple points of view from this troubled region, the festival unlocks delicate doors into human existence, highlighting concerns of our time that resonate with American audiences.